Sunday, July 20, 2014

You Would Like My New Boots


As The Girl says in every job application, she is not afraid of hard work. 
She has been helping me to clear our own private landfill site of years' worth of accumulated builders' waste.  The farmer who is working the land was supposed to have disposed of all this rubbish, but his idea of "getting rid of it" was to run a digger over the area and turn the soil over.  Somewhere under here there is at least one old washing machine (possibly two) and the remains of a boat.  
This was not the plan...
 
 So The Girl and I have been working our way across the field, gathering all the surface debris and wheelbarrowing it away to the back of the garage, where we are bagging it up ready to be taken to the council tip by the gardener.
The gamekeeper seems to find it most amusing.
Probably because he wasn't asked to do the job!
I have entertained idle thoughts about creating a wildflower meadow.
But considering my track record, with the local rabbit and deer population devouring all the seedlings from my fenced-off herb garden, I am not sure it is worth either the effort or the expense of sowing out such a large area of open ground.
I have preserved one "Everlasting Pea" and nine courgette plants from this year's planting.  The weld was gone in a flash, along with the swiss chard.
I think I should stick to knitting socks. 
That is the Planorbis Corneus pattern, free from the latest Knitty or you can buy it as part of the book:  "Knitter's Curiosity Cabinet Volume 3".  I am halfway down sock two already:  a long train journey to visit Grandma propelled me through this one!

I also finished my Solar Flair socks.
These were the ones that aggravated my RSI, so I was glad to see the back of them, even though I love using Hazel Knits Artisan Sock yarn.  The colour is "Cami Chic".
These came out pretty large:  it is a very stretchy pattern and the Artisan Sock is a heavy fingering weight.
They have been set aside for a future gift.
That's my 6th pair this year, so I might actually catch up with my goal to knit 12 pairs of socks before December :)
I have also been working on my crochet Mystery Blanket.
I ran out of yellow yarn 8 inches from the end of the penultimate row of stripe 9.
There was language.
When the new yarn arrived, I took special note of how far one ball stretched.  My conclusion is that one ball takes me round 3 sides of the square on a fairly plain treble-stitch based round.  This means that I only have enough yarn left to work 12 more rounds, which is not the end of the blanket.
But I don't think I can justify buying any more yarn - I reckon I have bought a total of 45 balls so far?
Gulp.
But it is looking pretty spectacular, if I say so myself!
I am going to use the yarn I already have and reduce the number of rows in the remaining stripes.  
At the moment, I am aiming to work stripes 10, 13, 14 and 15... unless I run out of yarn.
Fingers crossed.

And here is a final word from our sponsor:  hoo-woo!

 
 Can you see him (or her)?
I had to take this picture through the window, as the minute I open the door our owly neighbour is gone.
But I can sit on the sofa and watch it swooping around every evening - fantastic!

4 comments:

Kat said...

Amazing owl picture! We often hear a tawny owl twit-twooing of an evening but I have never been lucky enough to catch a glimpse of him/her...one day perhaps!

Minnado said...

The crochet blanket looks fabulous. I am in sympathy about the land clearing, we bought our house complete with uncleared garden which included a derelict mobile home and a rusting car with no wheels.
I am jealous of the resident owl - such a great thing to listen to and to see
xx

CarolS said...

Lovely socks and such neat knitting, I'm jealous. Wonderful owl, well done for managing a photograph and such a clear one. S/he's huge.

Lynn Barnes said...

I will confess that we had a can-and-bottle midden down in the woods at my childhood home. We burned everything else in a metal barrel, until the neighborhood gentrified and that was looked upon with horror. (Drying one's clothing on a line outside is also now frowned upon in these parts. I do it anyway.) Our trash filled in a deep ravine and kept it from eroding, so ... win-win? Some archaeologist will have fun sorting through our throw-aways, in the distant future. Or not.